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Tag: (e)Safeguarding Ordering

Do you feel suitably confident and equipped to teach about E- Safety and manage the issues in the classroom?

Our recent CICT (e)Safety and social media surveys revealed that “staff training remains one of the weakest aspects of (e)Safety provision within most schools”. To help to address this, as well as embedding (e)Safety and digital literacy in all aspects of our ICT Curriculum, we have designed a parallel support course for head teachers, teachers and classroom practitioners.

Online technology forms a significant part of most young people’s lives. Mobile phone use; texting; social networking sites: online gaming: instant messaging; downloading: YouTube uploads: all of these technologies offer powerful learning opportunities as long as the risks are managed well. Schools can offer first steps towards establishing good online behaviour that not only empowers young people but helps reduce the risk, through effective education in all key stages and across the school curriculum.

Our new ICT curriculum Scheme of Work (containing an (e)Safety strand) course aims to: •Introduce delegates to the online and mobile technologies that young people use and the associated risks and behaviours •Familiarise delegates with an array of practical resources and classroom programmes •Explore opportunities to map resources to curriculum planning within your own unique context Upon successful completion, the course will enable delegates to: •Create a planned (e)Safety progression for your students •Plan (e)Safety opportunities into the existing curriculum •Create and use a variety of (e)Safety resources •Use course materials to cascade training to colleagues •Become familiar with some of the online technologies that your students could be currently using and some of the real risks, issues and behaviours associated with those technologies •Explore some of the best primary, secondary and SEN resources and inbuild time to explore them •Review examples of existing (e)Safety progressions and curriculum planning for KS 1&2&3&4 •Identifying areas of the existing curriculum where (e)Safety could potentially be taught

We support organisations and groups with their policies, audits and technical know-how and offer training around (e)Safety, Digital Professionalism and Data Security. Please use the links at the left-hand side of this area of the website to find further information.

We highly recommend that organisations and groups make use of the free SWGfL Online Compass tool which provides clear guidance and resources to support online safety in a range of organisations. It can provide the ability to dip in and out of several crucial areas of (e)Safety and share judgments. The colour coding of statements that you enter can provide clarity while visual data can help to prioritise your actions. It may be useful for any group working with children and young people to support safer working practice.

Users of the Online Compass Audit tool have reported that it can create a mechanism for debate and discussion around (e)Safety within staff teams in organisations such as Children’s Centres, Youth Services and Libraries, and also with parents and volunteers using those services. It enabled them to identify areas were they needed to make improvements but also changes and areas where they were doing well at ensuring their staff, volunteers and families were safe.

Organisations working with children may need a systemic and sustainable pathway to ensure they meet (e)Safety requirements in the areas of Management, People and Technology. If you are offering children and young people or staff access to the internet or allowing them to Bring Their Own Device (BYOD) into your organisations places and spaces, it may bring with it legal and moral obligations. These can be clearly articulated in the Online Compass which can help you to navigate some of these challenges and it may help to fill some gaps in your monitoring processes.

Do you feel confident to work with young people using digital technologies, or to use social media in your own personal life while ensuring you are not damaging your organisations or your own reputation, offending anyone, or even exposing yourself to potential abuse?

 While the focus of online safety is quite rightly around the protection of young people there is growing awareness that professionals can also be the victims of abuse as a result of digital technologies, or that they can easily wind up in very hot water due to (often unintentional) comments or postings on social media platforms that can easily be read as flippant, ill-advised, or could be misconstrued or even considered offensive or illegal.

 Our CICT Team are experiencing a growing number of cases where professionals are requiring advice and support as a result of being abused online from young people and parents or other adults, or becoming (sometimes unwittingly) embroiled in online spats and arguments, or tweeting/posting in company time or viewing or posting inappropriate materials. With more and more professionals working with young people having online presences with Facebook, Twitter and similar, they are potentially putting themselves at risk from malicious abuse or provoking the consternation or disapproval of colleagues, line managers, authorities and the wider public.

 We can support you to consider those risks and the measures that can be put in place to ensure professional identity and reputation are protected. We can introduce organisations and professionals to the concept of professional identity in a connected society, and the risks and benefits in engaging with young people via online technologies, or posting personal or private information to the public domain. By facilitating understanding we can raise confidence in protecting professional identity of individuals and employees and provide an array of relevant and practical resources and programmes.

 Upon successful completion, our ‘Digital Professionalism’ course will enable delegates to:

 

Conduct a risk assessment for potential online abuse or problems that may arise resulting from job role and social behaviours Carry out a personal audit of their online footprint Implement strategies for protecting themselves online and reduce the risks associated with engagement with young people (and in some cases, parents) in such environments. Review workplace policies to ensure protection for professionals and identify lines of support in the event of incidents. Review some protection mechanisms provided by technologies and how can they be used to protect professional identity. Some legal issues related to the disparaging of, or abuse of, professionals online Explore how we might communicate to young people/parents/etc the potential impact of online abuse, what is not acceptable and what measures will be taken if such incidents occur? Ensure that policies are in place, and sanctions for unacceptable use are shared and understood

Online Compass is a free, powerful tool designed by award-winning online safety experts that can show you what you need to do to make the use of technology safer for your organisation or group. Once you rate where you are, it can give you advice on how to improve and the means to get you there. Online Compass is free and is appropriate for groups working with children and young people. The simple and user-friendly tool was built by online safety experts and can simplify what could seem like a daunting and difficult task. It can help you to map where you are, chart your progress and navigate a course to a safer online environment.


The online safety tool is divided into three Sections, with each section containing a number of Parts. Each Part has three level statements - red, amber or green, with red representing the lowest level of achievement and green showing the highest.



As you progress through Online Compass a range of certificates and awards become available to recognise and celebrate your progress. Achieving an award provides access to certificates, press release templates and logos for your use.

If you require any further help using the Online Compass tool please get in touch with us.

 

Have you considered developing the role of the (e)Safety Peer Mentors in your school?

Peer mentoring can be a powerful force within a school to support Children and Young people. Recent news stories have highlighted how effective peer mentoring can be. Many schools, for example, have introduced peer mentors schemes to help tackle bullying and support the victims of bullying. The CICT Team can support individual schools and organisations in setting up (e)Safety peer mentor schemes.

If you are thinking of introducing some of your students to the concept of (e)Safety Peer Mentors you may need to understand current trends in online communications so that your confidence is raised in training peer mentors and developing their roles.

We can also help you to develop existing teams and to deliver age-appropriate training to children and young people about online safety issues. Students may need to know when an issue needs to be referred to an adult. Peer Mentors have been proven to deliver highly effective (e)Safety messages to a wider audience within their own school and partner schools.

Online games where you can chat and play with people (you sometimes don’t know) from around the world can be great - but there are risks too.

Sometimes it’s easy to get so involved in a game, that you feel like you will do anything to win, or get to the next level. It can be easy to become addicted, so try to take regular breaks and keep yourself grounded and realistic.

Be careful that you don’t get tricked or blackmailed to give out any personal details such as:

your IM address your email address your photo your real name where you go to school use a nickname as your username/ character name

You don’t need to share any personal information to enjoy the game!

Gaming on the Internet can bring risks of grooming and exposure to rude or explicit material, just as it can on other areas of the Internet. Console games can be fun, educational, and interactive, but there can also be hidden dangers. Also, the content of some games can include dodgy content, violence, and crude language. Plus, Internet-connected games can enable young people to interact with strangers, some of whom can be a bad influence, or even mean to do you harm.

Many young people routinely play 18 rated games, and are exposed to such dangers, but there are serious questions about whether some of them have the critical skills to be able to recognise the warning signs and then be able to do the right thing.

82% of children say they are gamers. One-third of teen gamers (ages 15-17) report playing games with people they first met online. 13% of underage teenagers are able to buy 18-rated games and many more have access to them through friends and neighbours Many children (despite our good advice) continue to meet people in the real world that they have only known online. Some report that they were safe because they took a friend (the same age!) with them!

There is a new rating system in Europe called PEGI which can help you decide if you want to be involved in a game or not. It looks similar to film classification and tells you which age group the game is appropriate for and what kind of content it might contain.

Violence
- Game contains depictions of violence Discrimination
- Game contains depictions of, or material which may encourage, discrimination Sex
- Game depicts nudity and/or sexual behaviour or sexual references Drugs
- Game refers to or depicts the use of drugs Fear
- Game may be frightening or scary for young children Bad Language
- Game contains bad language

 

 

Social networking provides us with unprecedented opportunities for communication using a variety of multimedia, and also with new ways to advertise ourselves to the world, but always try to be careful what, and how much, information you give out on your profile. Remember that you may not know who your friend’s friends are… or (even less) your friend’s friends’ friends! And you don’t know what they’ll do with your picture or your phone number if you give it out to more people than you intended to by mistake or otherwise. Once your picture is out there, it is usually out there forever and you won’t be able to get it back. Once it is out of the box, you can’t get it back in!

Be aware that information on your profile could potentially be viewed by anyone. So if you wouldn’t be comfortable printing it off and handing it out to anyone on the street, maybe it shouldn’t be on your profile?

We recommend that you use a nickname or your initials instead of your name (you don’t want just anyone knowing who you are!). Consider changing your photo to a cool graphic or picture of your favourite band or pet, that way strangers won’t have access to a picture of you. It’s not a great idea to post where you’re going on your profile or twitter or where you live. Think through if you’d want everyone who can view the post to turn up at any time!

Think through who you want to chat to and how many of your personal thoughts you want anyone to view. Sometimes, it can seem a good idea to share what you got up to with your boyfriend last night, or the argument you had with your best mate; but as you’re writing remember that information could be public forever! It is tempting to share loads of stuff on your profile, especially since you’re often typing from the comfort of your own home. But remember, the internet is a public space. Test yourself by asking “would I want my teacher/Mum/Dad/stranger on the street to see this?” If the answer is no… DON’T post it!

Be careful who you agree to accept into your forums / private chat areas. Unfortunately because there are so many young people using these sites, adults with bad intentions may use them to make contact with children too; so you’re safer to only chat to people you know in the real world.

If you know someone… who knows someone… who knows someone, it rarely makes them your friend, so think carefully about whether you should be chatting to them and what kind of things you’re saying. Ask yourself this question ‘does having a thousand facebook friends make me look cool or desperate?’)

If you feel anyone is being weird with you or your friends; or if someone is bullying you on one of these sites contact the administrator of the chat area. If they don’t get back you might want to think twice about using the site again!

If it’s really serious – like you think the person contacting you may be an adult who wants to abuse you or your mates, report the issue on the thinkuknow website by using their ‘Report Abuse’ button or talk to any trusted adult.

Use your Privacy Settings.

Adjust your account settings (sometimes called “Privacy Settings”) so only approved friends can instant message you. This is unlikely to ruin your social life as new people can still send you friend requests and message you, they just won’t be able to pester you via IM. This means that people you don’t want to see your profile can’t!

Some social networking sites are really well run and the administrators will try to help you remember to keep your personal information to yourself. Others are not so good so be careful when choosing which areas you go to.

Only upload pictures that you’d be happy for your mum or you grandparents or teachers to see. Anything too suggestive or sexy to be passed round the dinner table should NEVER make it onto the web, as you don’t know who could be looking at it or what they might be doing with it. It may be worth scanning your gallery and thinking about what kind of an image they are portraying to the outside world.

Don’t post your phone number or email address on your homepage. Think about why anyone would actually need this info when you can message them or they can message you privately via your social networking site anyway?

Don’t post pictures of you or your mates wearing school uniform. If dodgy people see your school badge, they can work out where you are and find you. The more anonymous you are, the less vulnerable you are to people who may have bad intentions.

Tick the “no pic forwarding” option on your settings page to stop people forwarding your pictures to anyone without your consent.

Remember not to give too much away in a blog.

Yes, by all means tell the world you’re going to a party on Saturday night. But don’t post details of where it is. Real friends can phone you to get details, why would a complete stranger need to know this information?

Social networks such as Facebook, Tumblr, Club Penguin and Twitter have grown to become hugely popular online activities, but many young people clearly need a greater awareness of the image of themselves they may be projecting to the outside world, as well as understanding some of the negative influences and culture they may be absorbing whilst online.

Despite the 13-year-old recommended minimum age, over half of parents of 10, 11 and 12-year-olds say their child has a Facebook account, and three-quarters of these helped their child create the account. Many more young people enrol at a very early age. 40% of teens have seen pictures on social networks of their peers getting drunk, passing out, making an exhibition of themselves, or using drugs, and half of these first viewed these pictures when they were 13 or younger. More than 11% of teens are “hyper-networkers”, spending more than three hours per school day on social network sites.

It may be wise to consider what kind of an image your profile and uploaded content portrays to the outside world. What would it look like to your Grandparents, Religious Leaders, Employers or College Deans etc? Are your pictures too revealing, do you swear, are you unkind, do you complain too much? What do you do in your spare time? Are there positive things that you could mention more, such as voluntary or charitable work, creative skills or achievements? Do you think it is a good idea to have hundreds or thousands of ‘friends’? Could you possibly really know them all? Does it look a bit ‘desperate’?

And…if we haven’t mentioned it enough already… Please lock down your security settings to ensure your pictures and information are only available to the people you choose. Remember, by default they may NOT be locked down!

Cyberbullying is when someone uses the internet or mobiles to deliberately upset or threaten someone else. This is just another form of real-world bullying and no-one should ever have to put up with it! By using technology like mobiles or the internet, this type of bullying can affect someone not just at school, but at home as well. Because it takes place in the virtual world, it has a 24/7 nature and can make someone feel upset or threatened in their own home at any time of day or night.

It can sometimes be hard to identify who the cyberbully is because they could block their number or post things on a website anonymously. The nature of this type of bullying means it can have a large audience, many of whom may not even realise they are being bullies.

On the other hand, a positive thing about this kind of bullying is that it can be evidenced. With normal bullying, it can be one person’s word against another’s, but with cyberbullying you can save texts or print out emails / IM’s / WebPages. This can be used as proof to catch the bully and stop them upsetting you or anyone else.

We recommend that you save all evidence you have of the bullying. If you have nasty emails or things posted on your profile save them so you can use it as proof. Save texts or voicemails that say anything horrible. Learn how to block the bully on IM or delete them from your contacts. NEVER reply or retaliate to things they say or do; it might make the situation worse, and people on the outside may think you have contributed to the situation. If you don’t respond, the bullies are more likely to get bored and move on.

If you are being bothered via text, contact your service provider. Each network has a special area for this sort of problem. Check out their website or call them for advice or a free number change. Please see below for a range of contacts.

Contacts:

O2: ncb@o2.com or 08705 214000 Vodafone: 191 from a Vodafone phone or 08700 700191 (pay monthly) & 08700776655 (pay as you go) 3: call 333 from a 3 phone or 08707 33033 Orange: Call 450 on an Orange phone or 07973 100450 T-Mobile: Call 150 on a T-mobile phone or 08454 125000

Although bullying is not a specific criminal offence in UK law, criminal and civil laws can apply in terms of, for example, harassment or threatening behaviour, and particularly relevant for cyberbullying – threatening and menacing communications:

Protection from Harassment Act 1997, which has both criminal and civil provision Malicious Communications Act 1988 Section 43 of the Telecommunications Act 1984 Communications Act 2003 Public Order Act 1986

If you’re being bullied because of where you come from or the colour of your skin, this can be racism and depending on what is being said and where, could be a criminal offence under “inciting racial hatred” laws. Xenophobia means someone has an unreasonable distrust or hatred of strangers, foreigners, or anything perceived as foreign or different. These kinds of feelings may be directed against you and this is ALWAYS unacceptable. Please report it as an urgency.

If you know someone who is being cyberbullied or have seen nasty profiles or messages going around, it is your duty to report it. Cyberbullying can be really scary for the person being bullied as the audience can be huge, loads of people could be seeing the mean things that have been said and done. Don’t be a bystander. Take a principled stand! If you see anything that looks like cyberbullying, it is your duty to report it. Tell an adult you trust about what is going on and they may be able to help offer support to the person who is being bullied.

Never participate in forwarding pictures, messages or insults about a person. You may think it is a joke, but you could be really upsetting the person involved and even committing a crime. To look at or forward this sort of stuff means you are contributing to cyberbullying. You become a part of the problem, not a part of the solution.

Standing back and letting it happen can be just as bad. If you are worried that someone is getting threatened or hurt by others, offer them support, speak up on their behalf, or inform an adult you trust so they can help make it stop. Always respect other people and be aware of what you are sending and receiving whilst online.

Bullying that may have traditionally happened in school, perhaps on the playground or school bus, can still be the same old behaviour, but can now take place in the digital world (hence ‘cyber’-bullying). Hurtful words can be exchanged. Fingers can point. Rumours can start easily and spread quickly. Private pictures or comments made public. Profiles and e-mails can be hacked. These types of behaviours can still be common today but in more virtual spaces and on more devices, which can make them relentless 24/7.

In surveys 20% of teens have said their peers are “mostly unkind” to each other on social networks. 24% of teens and young adults have said someone has written something about them online that wasn’t true. 9% reported that someone has threatened to use electronic communication (Facebook, e-mail, text messages, etc.) to tell others private things about them as a form of blackmail.

It is hugely important that you never go it alone if you feel that you are being bullied. There are plenty of places that you can go for help. If you come across instances of bullying, don’t get involved and even take a stand against it if you can! There are skilled professionals in school who are able to help and even get several other agencies involved on your behalf including the police. Childline have a free phone number (0800 1111) you can ring, and CEOP have a button ‘Report Abuse’ you can press for instant help. 

 

 

Your password gives you access to your own disk space, your email, and also too many of the resources on your school computer system, and (if this isn’t too obvious!), it is what prevents anyone else gaining access to them.

If anybody does gain access to your account, any activities they perform with it, including unauthorised and illegal activities (cracking, downloading and/or sharing of copyrighted or illegal material etc.) may be traceable to you! Misuse of your account can be entirely your responsibility, even if it is misused by someone else!

It is therefore your responsibility to make sure your password is as secure as you can make it, and is not known to anyone besides yourself. This includes sharing it with your friends for convenience.

To keep your account secure:

When you are issued with a new password, if you have the right, change it immediately to something more secure. Do not keep your password written down anywhere. Absolutely do not keep your password and username written next to each other. Under no circumstances, give your password to anyone, even your most trusted friend or even a member of staff. If ever you suspect someone might know your password, report it so it can be changed, or change it immediately (if you have the rights).

Keeping your password secret is only one precaution. It is also important to choose a password which is hard for others to break. Password crackers work by brute force guesswork, using common passwords and dictionary words, and unfortunately they are constantly evolving to become better and better, so choosing a password which avoids the obvious makes it harder to break.

We strongly recommend that a reasonably secure password must:

be at least 7 characters long include a mixture of upper and lower case be difficult to guess Include a number Include complex characters Be changed every year or two (and maintain its level of complexity each time it is changed)

 

If you are setting your password yourself, we recommend that your new password must NOT:

be a dictionary word in any language be a person's name, especially not your own name use spaces, #,* or £ be a real word typed in backwards (such as sdrawkcab) a misspelt real word (such as difikult) words joined together (such as dog&cat) be a word with numbers substituted for letters (such as 5ub5titute) a keyboard sequence (such as qwerty) a well known sequence (such as 1234abcd)

This may be slightly surprising since not too long ago some of these methods were recommended! But, if you want to be really smart:

A good way to create a password which is secure and yet easy to remember is to take the initial letters of a favourite song, poem, quotation or statement, e.g. My brother lives at 43 Green Lane which gives Mbl@43GL as your password.

If you do insist on using a password which could be considered to break our guidelines then, to make it seem random and secure, offset your typing by one or more keys. Thus, Dog&Cat would become E9t&Dq5 by pressing the keys above and slightly to the left on the keyboard.

Of course, now you have seen our examples DO NOT USE EITHER OF THEM - a lot of people may have seen them! You need to apply these ideas with your own words and in your own way!

The Internet provides wonderful opportunities for communicating, researching, learning and working. Never before in human history was there such a wealth of information available to people with only a few clicks. We all seem to be spending more and more time on it. It is now possible to book tickets online, view and share posts, pictures and videos via your social networks, browse sites and services, purchase and download items, and much more.

Unfortunately, alongside such freedoms often come unintended or unwanted consequences; online predators and trolls, viruses, phishing scams, rip-offs, junk mail, rude and defamatory comments, pornography, overexposure, and routine plagiarism to  name but a few!

As a young person, by far the most dangerous thing you can do on the Internet is arrange to meet someone in real life that you have only ever met online. It is very easy for any person to hide behind an avatar or pseudonym and so someone you feel that you have known quite well could turn out to be your worst nightmare in real life. ‘Groomers’ or ‘online predators’ can be very patient people and take a long time developing a so-called relationship with their intended victims (possibly you?).

Internet predators can be expert manipulators, able to foster a relationship of dependence with a young person or teenager. They can prey on a teen’s desire to be liked, their desire for romance, or their curiosity. Often a predator “grooms” a child through flattery, sympathy, and by investing time in their online relationship. These can then turn into offline or real-world relationships which in extreme cases can be opportunities for kidnapping, violence, or abduction.

76% of such predators are 26 or older 47% of offenders are 20 years old than their victims 83% of victims who had met their offender face-to-face willingly went somewhere with them! They had already been persuaded!
Try to talk to your child about what they’re up to online. Be a part of their online life; involve the whole family and show an interest. Find out what sites they visit and what they love about them, if they know you understand they are more likely to come to you if they have any problems. Watch Thinkuknow films and cartoons with your child. The Thinkuknow site has films, games and advice for child from five all the way to 16.  Encourage your child to go online and explore! There is a wealth of age-appropriate sites online for your children. Encourage them to use sites which are fun, educational and that will help them to develop online skills. Keep up-to-date with your child’s development online. Children grow up fast and they will be growing in confidence and learning new skills daily. It’s important that as your child learns more, so do you. Set boundaries in the online world just as you would in the real world. Think about what they might see, what they share, who they talk to and how long they spend online. It is important to discuss boundaries at a young age to develop the tools and skills children need to enjoy their time online. As far as possible, keep all equipment that connects to the internet in a family space (this is increasingly difficult in a world of smartphones and universal wireless internet). For children of a younger age, it is important to keep internet use in family areas so you can see the sites your child is using and be there for them if they stumble across something they don’t want to see or you don’t want them to see. Know what connects to the internet and how. Nowadays even the TV and many games connect to the internet. Make sure you’re aware of which devices that your child uses connect to the internet, such as their phone or games console. Also, find out how they are accessing the internet – is it your connection, or a neighbour’s WIFI? This will affect whether the safety settings you set are being applied. Use parental controls on devices that link to the internet, such as the TV, laptops, computers, games consoles and mobile phones. Parental controls are not just about locking and blocking, they are a tool to help you set appropriate boundaries as your child grows and develops. They are not the answer to your child’s online safety, but they are a good start and they are not as difficult to install as you might think. Service providers are working hard to make them simple, effective and user friendly. Find your service provider and learn how to set your controls And finally, if we haven’t mentioned it already, talk, talk and talk some more!

Over the last few years, schools have increasingly been on the “front line of being online”, with school staff and leadership teams expected to deal with a whole host of complex issues related to online safety.

Research from CICT consultants, based on feedback from our use of the 360 degree safe self review tool with schools, and further information from DfE and OFSTED highlights that staff training and development is often one of the weakest aspects of school (e)Safety, both in its quality and frequency.

CICT (e)Safety Training goes beyond simple awareness-raising; with sharply focused training that grows expertise within your teams. We cover essential (e)Safety, (e)Safety for parents, staff digital professionalism and protecting online identity, CEOP Ambassador courses, student digital footprint assemblies and courses pinpointed on general (e)Safety, cyberbullying and sexting.

Our ‘Strategic (e)Safeguarding Health Check’ and our ‘Whole-school approaches to (e)Safeguarding’ courses facilitate a coordinated, whole-school approach to embedding and systemising (e)Safety throughout your school and involving all stakeholders in defining your provision.

Are you confident that your most sensitive and confidential data is secure? Do you and your staff know how to reduce risk? Understand your legal obligations regarding personal data? Do you need a no-nonsense guide using plain English?

“With the number of breaches involving people’s personal information reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) recently reaching over 1000, the privacy watchdog is urging organisations to minimise the risk of mistakes. Staff need simple procedures on how to handle personal information with appropriate training to ensure the importance of personal information is fully understood.” ICO July 2010

Schools are repositories of vast amounts of personal and often sensitive data: reports; case notes; IEP’s; assessments; personnel details; medical histories; SEN information; the list is endless. Yet there may be simple practices that can be adopted by schools to mitigate much of this risk. E-Security is covered in our ‘Digital Professionalism Workshop’ which (amongst other things) aims to: •Establish what is meant by personal data and the laws that pertain to it •Explore lines of responsibility for data within school (have you a designated Information Asset Owner?) •Review effective strategies that change the way data is perceived and managed •Examine technical solutions to secure data transfer •Encourage digital professionalism in terms of handling sensitive data or personal information

Upon successful completion, the ‘Digital Professionalism Workshop’ enables participants to: •Identify key areas of data risk within your school •Establish clear lines of responsibility for the most vulnerable data in your school •Rate risk in terms of impact •Move towards meeting statutory obligations towards data processing and management •Consider Personal Data and the law •Classify and label data appropriately •Take first steps to mitigating data loss •Consider encryption and password protection as a solution •Implement secure online access to data

Recent Ofsted briefing notes to their own Inspectors indicated the following inadequate practice in terms of whole-school (e)Safeguarding in many schools:

•Personal data is often unsecured and/or leaves school site without encryption.

•Security of passwords is ineffective, for example passwords are shared or common with all but the youngest children.

•Policies are generic and not updated.

•There is no progressive, planned (e)Safety education across the curriculum, for example there is often only an assembly held annually.

•There is inadequate or no internet filtering or monitoring.

•There is little or no evidence of staff training.

•Children are not aware of how to report a problem

Our CICT Team can help your school run Parents (e)Safety sessions or train your staff so that you can run your own sessions.

Using the experience gained from hundreds of parental presentations to literally thousands of parents regionally, and often supported by multi agency personnel, we can help you train your staff or a key staff member with a half day course in presenting a parent’s (e)Safety session.

Children and Young people have significantly embraced the so called Web 2.0 (participatory and interactive) sites and services, and online and mobile technologies. These technologies exist in a world, often very foreign to many adults who have not grown up with them but nonetheless have to learn to adapt or even play catch up with their children. Often schools are in the vanguard of keeping children safe on line, but this education can be lost if parents are unable to understand their role in supporting the aims of online safety and/or understanding how they can help.

Our CICT Parents (e)Safety course aims to: •Introduce parents to the online and mobile technologies that children and young people use and some associated risks and benefits.

•Discuss the issues that parents face in an ever changing electronic environment

•Illustrate how parents can be guided to and understand an array of relevant and practical resources and programmes

•Provide participants with an understanding of how to engage parents in converting their off line parenting skills into an online world through dialogue and communication with their children.

Upon successful completion, the course will enable participants to: •Understand the issues faced by parents in relation to the use of technology by children

•Raise awareness of (e)Safety for parents through a structured and considered presentation.

•Confidently point to and describe the leading resources available to all.

•Provide the school with valuable support on (e)Safety policies through more educated parents.

•Encourage further parental engagement in school activities

•Ensure that parents understand school Internet policies and practices

The Ofsted Report “Safe use of new technologies” (February 2010) reported on the survey of (e)Safety in schools.

The report concluded: ... “Although they (schools) had policies and procedures for (e)safety, most of the schools did not review these systematically. This meant that they were not able to evaluate accurately whether what they were doing was having a positive impact in terms of actually keeping their learners safe”.

Our CICT Team can support you to produce an up to date and relevant suite of (e)Safety policies for your school. A safe environment is a basic right and a responsibility that we all share, not only within the physical world, but increasingly within the online world (or cyber-world) where more and more children, young people and adults communicate, work and play. Online technologies have allowed school boundaries to stretch considerably beyond the school gate and, whilst we know this offers huge potential for new teaching and learning experiences, it brings with it a different set of responsibilities and issues that are often hard to understand track and manage.

In recent years, schools have increasingly been on the “front line of being online”: managing the fallout from online disputes; tackling cyber-bullying; managing the right response to inappropriate and illegal content; fielding public or parental criticism; dealing with threats to staff and students safety; protecting the school reputation and through all this, maintaining their safeguarding obligations.

A clearly understood school (e)Safety policy or connected suite of policies is a good starting point for ensuring that there is consistent and high quality (e)Safety practice across the school due to widespread adherence to the policy or policies by stakeholders.

Our ‘Whole-school approach to (e)Safeguarding’ course aims to:

•Introduce school leaders or (e)Safeguarding team members to some up-to-date and relevant School (e)Safety Policy Templates

•Provide an understanding of how a relevant policy or suite of policies can be produced and kept up to date

•Demonstrate how such policies can be continually shared with school stakeholders (particularly young people) so that they remain dynamic, evolving and crystallising

Upon successful completion, the course enables participants to: •Review their current (e)Safety policy and practice.

•Discuss aspects of policy development with other colleagues and also network with them post-course

•Use self-review tools to review and benchmark current (e)Safety provision

•Understand what needs to be covered in an (e)Safety policy (policies) and its supporting documents including cross-reference-ability to bullying, child protection, behaviour policies etc

•Produce an initial school (e)Safety policy or suite of policies with the correct aspects and elements and relevant scope

•Better involve the community in the process to create buy-in and ownership

 Developing your own AUP guidance information here

We highly recommend use of the Southwest Grid for Learning (SWGfL) 360 degree safe online self-review tool which provides a user friendly and interactive means for schools to review their (e)Safety provision and to develop an action plan to bring about improvements. The tool is currently free of charge to schools on completion of a simple registration process. It is intended to help schools review their (e)Safety policy and practice,providing:

• Management information and stimulus that can influence the production or review of (e)Safety policies and develop good practice.

• A process for identifying strengths and weaknesses.

• Opportunities for commitment and involvement from the whole school.

• A continuum for schools to discuss how they might move from a basic level provision for (e)Safety to practice that is truly aspirational and innovative

YHGFL

 

Do you feel confident to work with young people using digital technologies, or to use social media in your own personal life while ensuring you are not damaging your schools or your own reputation, offending anyone, or even exposing yourself to potential abuse?

While the focus of online safety is quite rightly around the protection of young people there is growing awareness that professionals can also be the victims of abuse as a result of digital technologies, or that they can easily wind up in very hot water due to (often unintentional) comments or postings on social media platforms that can easily be read as flippant, ill-advised, or could be misconstrued or even considered offensive.

Our CICT Team are experiencing a growing number of cases where professionals are requiring advice and support as a result of being abused online from young people and parents, or becoming (sometimes unwittingly) embroiled in online spats and arguments, or tweeting/posting in company time or posting inappropriate materials. With more and more professionals working with young people having online presences with Facebook, Twitter and similar, they are potentially putting themselves at risk from malicious abuse or provoking the consternation or disapproval of colleagues and line managers.

We can support you to consider those risks and the measures that can be put in place to ensure professional identity and reputation are protected. We can introduce schools and professionals to the concept of professional identity in a connected society, and the risks and benefits in engaging with young people via online technologies, or posting personal or private information to the public domain. By facilitating understanding we can raise confidence in protecting professional identity of individuals and employees and provide an array of relevant and practical resources and programmes.

Upon successful completion, our ‘Digital Professionalism’ course will enable delegates to:

Conduct a risk assessment for potential online abuse or problems that may arise resulting from job role and social behaviours

Carry out a personal audit of their online footprint

Implement strategies for protecting themselves online and reduce the risks associated with engagement with young people (and in some cases, parents) in such environments.

Review workplace policies to ensure protection for professionals and identify lines of support in the event of incidents.

Review some protection mechanisms provided by technologies and how can they be used to protect professional identity.

Some legal issues related to the disparaging of, or abuse of, professionals online

Explore how we might communicate to young people/parents/etc the potential impact of online abuse, what is not acceptable and what measures will be taken if such incidents occur?

 

Online environments are another space that young people inhabit in addition to their physical social locations, school and home. Professionals who work with children and young people are beginning to recognise that this too is an environment they can offer their services and provide support & advice. Many schools and colleges are seeing advantages to using social media to promote and celebrate success, impart information, advertise courses and build an online reputation.

Our CICT Team can support you to begin to explore the benefits of new collaborative technologies like Twitter, Linkedin, Pinterest, Edcanvas and Facebook.

 How can you make sure that the environment you eventually provide is safe not only for the young people to whom you reach out, but also the staff who engage with them and parents? There may be benefits and drawbacks for young people, your school staff and your organisation.

We can introduce schools to what online collaborative technologies are available and most appropriate. Through understanding them you may raise your confidence in their use. We can support you to understand risk, what it looks like, and how to map those risks to demonstrate duty of care. We can explore incident management routines and reporting mechanisms with you.

We have many examples of how this has been achieved successfully in practice. We can support you to develop a case for establishing an online service, setup a simple blog or web page or service on Edmodo, Pinterest, Facebook or Twitter etc. We can assist you to identify risk and map it across a variety of risk matrices. We can support you to implement strategies for protecting yourselves online and reduce the risks associated with engagement with young people and parents in such environments.

We can review your workplace policies to ensure protection for professionals and young people including identifying lines of support in the event of incidents. We can audit your institutional readiness through the use of tools such as “Online Compass”, “360 degree safe” and other (e)Safeguarding tools. 

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